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Conferences

2018


  • Information Engines at the Frontiers of Nanoscale Thermodynamics

    REGISTRATION

    Where?

    Telluride Science Research Center

    When?

    07/19/2018 – 07/27/2018

    Organizers

    Korana Burke
    Tommy Byrd
    Jim Crutchfield
    Sebastian Deffner

    Abstract

    Synthetic nanoscale machines, like their macromolecular biological counterparts, perform tasks that involve the simultaneous manipulation of energy, information, and matter. In this they are information engines —systems with two inextricably intertwined characters. The first aspect, call it “physical”, is the one in which the system is —seen embedded in a material substrate— that is driven by, manipulates, stores, and dissipates energy. The second aspect, call it “informational”, is the one in which the system— is seen in terms of its spatial and temporal organization —generates, stores, loses, and transforms information. Information engines operate by synergistically balancing both aspects to support a given functionality, such as extracting work from a heat reservoir. Recent years witnessed remarkable progress in the theoretical understanding and experimental exploration of how physical systems compute, process, and transfer information. We are on the verge of a synthesis that will allow us to account for a new thermodynamics of information. As we continue to develop a deeper understanding of the world around us, the fundamental question arises, How does nature compute? Numerous researchers, both theorists and experimentalists, are working towards understanding how information is transferred through and transformed at the nanoscale — with applications ranging from biological systems to quantum devices. The aim of this workshop is to exchange ideas from research in Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics, Classical and Quantum Information, Statistical Mechanics, Biophysics, and Nonlinear Dynamics. These questions are relevant in a wide variety of fields including Nanoscale Statistical Mechanics, Finite-Time Thermodynamics, Quantum Thermodynamics, Quantum Computation, Quantum Communication, Quantum Optimal Control Theory, and Biological Physics.

 

2017


  • Information Engines at the Frontiers of Nanoscale Thermodynamics

    REGISTRATION

    Where?

    Telluride Science Research Center

    When?

    08/03/2017 – 08/11/2017

    Organizers

    Korana Burke
    Tommy Byrd
    Jim Crutchfield
    Sebastian Deffner

    Abstract

    Synthetic nanoscale machines, like their macromolecular biological counterparts, perform tasks that involve the simultaneous manipulation of energy, information, and matter. In this they are information engines —systems with two inextricably intertwined characters. The first aspect, call it “physical”, is the one in which the system is —seen embedded in a material substrate— that is driven by, manipulates, stores, and dissipates energy. The second aspect, call it “informational”, is the one in which the system— is seen in terms of its spatial and temporal organization —generates, stores, loses, and transforms information. Information engines operate by synergistically balancing both aspects to support a given functionality, such as extracting work from a heat reservoir. Recent years witnessed remarkable progress in the theoretical understanding and experimental exploration of how physical systems compute, process, and transfer information. We are on the verge of a synthesis that will allow us to account for a new thermodynamics of information. As we continue to develop a deeper understanding of the world around us, the fundamental question arises, How does nature compute? Numerous researchers, both theorists and experimentalists, are working towards understanding how information is transferred through and transformed at the nanoscale — with applications ranging from biological systems to quantum devices. The aim of this workshop is to exchange ideas from research in Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics, Classical and Quantum Information, Statistical Mechanics, Biophysics, and Nonlinear Dynamics. These questions are relevant in a wide variety of fields including Nanoscale Statistical Mechanics, Finite-Time Thermodynamics, Quantum Thermodynamics, Quantum Computation, Quantum Communication, Quantum Optimal Control Theory, and Biological Physics.

 

2016


  • Information Engines at the Frontiers of Nanoscale Thermodynamics

    REGISTRATION

    Where?

    Telluride Science Research Center

    When?

    06/23/2016 – 07/01/2016

    Organizers

    Korana Burke
    Tommy Byrd
    Jim Crutchfiel
    Sebastian Deffner

    Abstract

    Synthetic nanoscale machines, like their macromolecular biological counterparts, perform tasks that involve the simultaneous manipulation of energy, information, and matter. In this they are information engines —systems with two inextricably intertwined characters. The first aspect, call it “physical”, is the one in which the system is —seen embedded in a material substrate— that is driven by, manipulates, stores, and dissipates energy. The second aspect, call it “informational”, is the one in which the system— is seen in terms of its spatial and temporal organization —generates, stores, loses, and transforms information. Information engines operate by synergistically balancing both aspects to support a given functionality, such as extracting work from a heat reservoir. Recent years witnessed remarkable progress in the theoretical understanding and experimental exploration of how physical systems compute, process, and transfer information. We are on the verge of a synthesis that will allow us to account for a new thermodynamics of information. As we continue to develop a deeper understanding of the world around us, the fundamental question arises, How does nature compute? Numerous researchers, both theorists and experimentalists, are working towards understanding how information is transferred through and transformed at the nanoscale — with applications ranging from biological systems to quantum devices. The aim of this workshop is to exchange ideas from research in Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics, Classical and Quantum Information, Statistical Mechanics, Biophysics, and Nonlinear Dynamics. These questions are relevant in a wide variety of fields including Nanoscale Statistical Mechanics, Finite-Time Thermodynamics, Quantum Thermodynamics, Quantum Computation, Quantum Communication, Quantum Optimal Control Theory, and Biological Physics.

 

2015


  • Thermodynamics and Nonlinear Dynamics in the Information Age

    REGISTRATION

    Where?

    Telluride Science Research Center

    When?

    07/13/2015 – 07/17/2015

    Organizers

    Korana Burke
    Sebastian Deffner
    Adolfo del Campo

    Abstract

    Since its beginnings one of the main purposes of thermodynamics has been the optimization of devices. Commonly, processes are characterized as optimal if they are maximally fast or maximally efficient. Recent years have seen the development of various theoretical tools which tremendously broadened our understanding of such optimal processes, in quantum mechanics and in classical physics. A particular highlight are so-called shortcuts to adiabaticity — finite time processes that mimic adiabatic dynamics without the requirement of slow driving. These exciting new results found relevance and application in a wide variety of fields including Quantum Sensing and Metrology, Finite-Time Thermodynamics, Quantum Simulation, Quantum Computation, Quantum Communication, and Quantum Optimal Control Theory. A second pillar of modern thermodynamic optimization are so-called information engines. In these systems the effects of information gain and its feedback into the dynamics are explicitly studied. As a consequence Maxwell demon-like systems have lost its demonic obscurity and have become an integral part of realistic optimization. All of these processes are frequently governed by inherently nonlinear equations. This conference aims at an exchange of ideas from researchers in Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics, Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences, Quantum Information and Quantum Technologies, Statistical Mechanics, Optimal Control Theory, and Nonlinear Dynamics.

    Report

    Dynamical Systems Magazine, October 2015